Okonomiyaki (Japanese Pancakes) No Pork Recipe | Eurolinguiste Culture & Cuisine

This past month one of the recipes in my Try the World box was for Okonomiyaki. Okonomiyaki is often referred to as a Japanese pancake. It can contain any number of ingredients and it is associated with the Kansai and Hirosima areas of Japan.

In Japanese “okonomi” means “what you like” and “yaki” means “grilled” or “cooked”. And that’s pretty much what okonomiyaki is – whatever you like grilled as a pancake.

So what are some of the main ingredients?

Okonomiyaki usually has a special batter, eggs, cabbage, meat (often bacon strips), green onion, bonito flakes, and okonomiyaki sauce. Of course, ingredients vary quite significantly and the recipe I’m going to share with you below is my own variation based on our personal tastes.

This recipe for okonomiyaki is cabbage-free, pork-free and can be fish-free.

The Ingredients for Eurolinguiste’s Okonomiyaki

Makes 2-3 pancakes

The batter:

  • 1 medium sized sweet potato or yam grated
  • 2 eggs
  • About 100g of okonomiyaki flour (can be found at most Asian supermarkets)
  • 1/4 cup of green onion
  • 1/4 cup of vegetable tempura bits (or bonita flakes)
  • 1 pack of thinly sliced kobe steak (about .31 lbs)

Toppings:

  • Okonomiyaki sauce, to taste – don’t use this sauce if you are allergic to fish. You can instead use a sweet teriyaki sauce.
  • Sriracha mayonnaise, to taste
  • Vegetable tempura bits (or bonita flakes), to taste 

Cabbage-Free and Pork-Free Okonomiyaki Recipe

Combine the okonomiyaki flour, shredded yam, egg, green onion, and 1/4 cup of tempura bits in the bowl until well mixed.

Heat oil in a pan and divide the batter into either two or three balls. Careful place them in the pan and flatten them with the spatial (until they are about 1/2 thick).

Distribute the meat across each of the okonomiyaki. Cook on one side for about eight minutes and then flip them over so that the meat is now on the bottom for about another eight minutes.

Transfer the okonomiyaki to plates and add okonomiyaki sauce, sriracha mayonnaise, and additional tempura bits to taste.

This is a great variation of okonomiyaki for those with food restrictions or allergies. M and I really enjoyed them. A big thanks to Try the World for the batter and for the inspiration to do this recipe!

okonomiyaki-recipe-no-cabbage

If you’re interested in checking out more recipes and foods from around the world, I really recommend Try the World. They’re a subscription box that focuses on various cuisines and treats from across the globe. You can find out more here or check out my latest unboxing video.

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I'm a language lover, traveler and musician sharing my adventures and language learning tips over at Eurolinguiste. Join me on Facebook for daily language learning and travel tips!

  • Wow, this sounds really good! I like how so many different countries have their own variation on pancakes. My personal favorite are Russian ones. They’re called blini and are AMAZING.

    • Thanks Natalie! Blini sound delicious from what I’ve heard/read. Any particular recipes you recommend?

      • Embarrassingly enough, I’ve never made them myself! The best ones I’ve had, though, are at this Russian fast-food chain called the Teaspoon (Чайная ложка). I went to a location in Гостиный двор in St. Petersburg and oh my, they were excellent. Очень вкусно! [Very delicious!]

        • If I ever make it to Russian/St Petersburg, I will have to try out Teaspoon! Thanks for the recommendation, Natalie!