Language Learning Strategies | #CleartheList July 2017 Eurolinguiste / Language Resources

It’s July and tomorrow is Independence Day, so to all of my American friends, I wish you a Happy 4th of July! 

If you’re new around these parts, #clearthelist is a linkup where we share our monthly goals, and by we, I mean myself, Lindsay of Lindsay Does Languages, Kris Broholm of Actual Fluency, and Angel Pretot of French Lover.

We’d absolutely love for you to a part of our community. You can join us by adding a link to your own goal post below.

So let’s get started, sharing our goals and motivating one another to #clearthelist!

Please feel free to tag your posts or photos with either #clearthelist on your favorite social media channels!

Last Month’s Highlights on Instagram

Last Month’s Blog Highlights

Travel

None this month – I focused on language learning. 

Language Learning

5 Things You Can Do When You Don’t Have Time to Learn a Language // A post to help you find a little bit more time to fit language study into your routine.

How to Get Stuff Done When You Study a Language // Tips for having more productive language studies.

100+ Ways to Make Language Learning a Part of Your Day // An epic post that sorts everything by skill – reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Last Month’s Goals

Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // I worked on this a tiny, little bit. It counts, right?

Read one more language related book. // I read Lingo by Gaston Dorren and it was really good. Highly recommended!

Transcribe the dialogues from Zelda Ocarina of Time in Mandarin Chinese that I currently have saved. // I did! Feeling so good getting back on track with everything.

Get ahead reading my language reading challenge books. // Yes! I’m finally ahead again and I hope to keep it that way.

Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // Yes. I realized that most of the videos in my queue weren’t things that I cared about watching. They were things I cared about listening to. When I realized this, I was able to set my queue to play automatically and listen to them in my car. Don’t worry – my phone was in my center console, so I wasn’t distracted! Realizing this made a huge difference for me.

Read something in Chinese // I started up using LingQ again. I had to take a break while I was finishing up Language Learning Accelerator, but I’m back at reading the Hunger Games in Chinese.

Keep adding words from Chinese readings into my Memrise Chinese deck AND THEN STUDY THEM. // I started studying these at the very end of the month, so I suppose it counts.

Have something I’m reading that’s in French or Spanish. // Yes! El Nombre del Viento for the win. Seriously, LingQ is my favorite tool ever.

Keep working through my language podcasts. // I actually finished ALL of the lessons I had in my queue. This probably means I drive way too much, but hey. I can’t complain if it means I get to study languages uninterrupted, right?

This Month’s Goals

Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // Like I keep saying, this will be a never ending project. And it’s wonderful.

Read the next Language Reading Challenge book on my list. // If you haven’t already, you can join us on Goodreads!

Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // I still have a long way to go.

Read something in Chinese, French, and/or Spanish. // At the level I’m at for these three languages, this is one of the best ways I can continue to improve them.

Study my dang Chinese Memrise deck! Sheesh. // Even though I started this at the end of June, it wasn’t as much as I wanted. I seriously need to get on this.

Finish distilling my old Russian notes. // I decided to start over with Russian, so  I’m working through all of my old notes to start.

Record my first video(s) in Japanese. // I finally started to learn this beautiful language and I’m excited about it. Plus, Little Linguist likes me speaking it, so that’s encouraging.

Resources I Used This Month

A quick recap on the materials I am using.

What I Am Using to Learn Chinese

What I’m Using to Brush Up/Improve My French:

  • LingQ
  • Immersion (we speak franglais at home)
  • Reading books written by French authors
  • Listening to French radio/podcasts
  • Chatting with family
  • Watching movies and other videos in French

What I am Using to Learn Russian:

What I am Using to Learn Korean:

What I am Using to Learn Spanish:

What I’m Using to Learn Japanese:

  • The One Minute Japanese podcast from the Radio Lingua network
  • JapanesePod101

What I’m Using for Little Linguist

Resources That Aren’t Language Specific

The Biggest Lesson I Am Taking Away from This Month

I seriously love Russian.

I do. I had a really tough time with it the first go (same as Korean), but I just couldn’t stay away from it. Every time I hear Russian, I marvel at how beautiful it sounds and it just stirs up this incredible desire to sit down and learn it.

I psyched myself out a bit too much with the grammar the last time, so I want to approach it a little differently this time. Hopefully my teachers will work with me (is it just me or do Russian tutors all really seem to want to focus on grammar?). I hope to persevere this time and finally learn this language that I so adore

Don’t forget that I would love to hear all about your goals for this month! Please join us by adding your post to the linkup below! 

Clear The List Linkup Rules:

1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

2. Link back to this post. You can use our button if you wish.

3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages, Shannon from Eurolinguiste, Kris from Actual Fluency, and Angel from French Lover.

4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList


Get the Button:

Set your language learning goals as a part of the Clear the List Link Up hosted by Shannon Kennedy of Eurolinguiste, Lindsay Dow of Lindsay Does Languages, Angel Pretot of French Lover, and Kris Broholm of Actual Fluency #clearthelist



I’m a language lover, traveler and musician sharing my adventures and language learning tips over at Eurolinguiste.

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  • theElectricHare

    I like the idea of just listening to your youtube queue rather than watching them. Sometimes I watch youtube videos and realise I could be doing something else along side them, so I’ve been able to listen to them at work while I’m getting on with other things!

    • This is EXACTLY why I started doing this. The value isn’t always visual. 🙂

  • Ура for restarting Russian, Shannon!!!!! I’m SUPER excited to follow your studies! 😀

    Also, thank you so much for re-sharing your posts on language learning motivation and ideas, especially the 100+ Ways article. I hadn’t read those posts before, and they’ve really helped me recalibrate language goals with everyday life. How had I never thought of listening to an audiobook in a target language? Genius!

    Good luck with your July goals! Пока!

    • Thanks Katherine. Glad to have given you a few new ways to work on your languages. I’m pretty excited about my Russian refresh too.

  • Femme Nikita

    Yes, Russians do teach using traditional methods. This old fashioned way of grammar drills has long tradition there but also in other Slavic countries. But fear not, Russian grammar is easier than Polish one (trust the native speaker of both) since Russian exceptions can be put into various categories within which all words follow one rule whereas in Polish… an exception is just an exception and has to be learnt by heart. I was shocked to discover last week that native speakers of Polish reach fluency in Polish at the age of 16 years.(on average kids in most European languages reach such fluency after 10 years of learning their native language, Japanese kids within 6-8 years of learning Japanese-just for the sake of comparison) 😉 No wonder I was struggling as a kid in primary school when I moved from Russia to Poland. (Although I’m Polish, Polish language was actually the third language I’ve learnt as a kid after Russian being my first and English my second. Such strange life history). So well, Russian is not as difficult as it may seem due to maybe a bit strangely looking alphabet. As for alphabet- if You get it You will be able to read Ukrainian and Bulgarian. I do both on regular basis even though I have never learnt any of them. In Ukrainian some words have different ethymology than in Russian but I would say that those words make for just a tiny fraction of this language. I can read newspapers from Ukraine on line without any problems. Same with Bulgarian when I travelled there and had to read a tourist guide or all sorts of information around me. So here You have some hidden bonus of learning Russian. And whenever You feel overwhelmed with Russian think of Polish which could have been much worse. 😉

    • Thanks Nikita! I’m actually quite fine with reading the language. It’s more the grammar for me at this point. 🙂 Cases and my horrible pronunciation – yikes! I love the language though, so I hope to stick with it.

  • Tiia M

    Looking forward to hear how your Russian and Japanese studies take off! I definitely feel the same way about Russian – like you said, every time I hear it, I can help but marvel… There’s something so enchanting about it. Best of luck for the rest of July!

    • Absolutely. It’s probably my favorite sounding language for sure. Thanks for the well wishes! All the best to you with your projects as well.