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  • Clear the List | Monthly Language Learning Strategies Update | May

    So much has changed since my last #clearthelist post! I’ve started a new language, have already completed my first Fi3M Challenge with it and am already on to the next language project! It’s time for a quick catchup!

    On to #clearthelist …

    If you’re new around these parts, #clearthelist is a linkup where we share our monthly goals, and by we, I mean myself, and Lindsay of Lindsay Does Languages.

    We’d absolutely love for you to a part of our community. You can join us by adding a link to your own goal post below.

    So let’s get started, sharing our goals and motivating one another to #clearthelist!

    Please feel free to tag your posts or photos with either #clearthelist on your favorite social media channels!

    Last Month’s Highlights on Instagram

    Last Month’s Goals

    I didn’t share these, so let’s skip to this month!

    This Month’s Goals

    Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // Little Linguist has actually started having his very own Mandarin Chinese lessons!

    Maintain my vocabulary learning streak. // I want to keep up my vocabulary learning streak for as long as possible–something I was very good at doing but have fallen off on. Now that I’ve picked it back up, I’ve noticed that it does have a significant impact on what I actively use when speaking the languages.

    Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // After my Youtube channel was terminated, I had to recreate my queue. I’m back up to several hundred videos I can work through to improve my languages.

    Fluent in 3 Months Challenge // I’m almost a month into my Fluent in 3 Months Challenge for Russian and I’d like to keep working at it.

    Keep reading Game of Thrones in Russian. // My tutor and I are reading through this together and discussing it each week.

    Study Stranger Things in Hungarian. // Likewise, my Hungarian tutor and I are discussing Stranger Things in Hungarian each week.

    Find a new Japanese tutor. // I’d like to keep up my speaking practice in Japanese, so I’m currently looking for a new tutor.

    Maintain my weekly lessons in each language. // I’m currently taking weekly lessons for many of my languages, and I’d like to keep it up.

    Resources I Used This Month

    A quick recap of the materials I am using.

    What I Am Using to Learn Chinese

    What I’m Using to Brush Up/Improve My French:

    • LingQ
    • Listening to French radio/podcasts

    What I am Using to Learn Russian:

    What I am Using to Learn Hebrew:

    What I am Using to Learn Korean:

    What I am Using to Learn Spanish:

    What I am Using to Learn Italian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Japanese:

    What I’m Using to Learn Croatian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Hungarian:

    Not Currently doing any study for: German, Hindi

    What I’m Using for Little Linguist

    Resources That Aren’t Language Specific

    The Biggest Lesson I Am Taking Away from This Month

    Over the last year, a lot has happened–for example, I’ve released two albums, have traveled some, and as you all know and have experienced first-hand, have been working to adapt to the changes brought on by COVID.

    When I first picked my language studies back up after being on-and-off with them for some time, I made a big mistake. I tried to pickup my routine exactly as I had left it off.

    Needless to say, that didn’t work out for me.

    The reason I dropped off was two-fold. One, life. Two, my language learning routine had gotten to the point it was no longer sustainable. I was trying to do too much.

    So after a couple of failed attempts at getting back into it, I decided to take it slow. I participated in a Fluent in 3 Months Challenge to give myself something clear to work towards– a 15-minute conversation. I then began doing lessons again for my key languages. Once I had established doing this as a routine, I added podcasts back in. And then vocabulary study.

    I’m now at a point where I’m able to include other things like reading and tv shows. But I’m be careful not to take too much on.

    TLDR? I learned to ease myself back into a habit after dropping off.

    Don’t forget that I would love to hear all about your goals for this month! Please join us by adding your post to the linkup below! 

    Clear The List Linkup Rules:

    1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

    2. Link back to this post. You can use our button if you wish.

    3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

    4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

    5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList

    You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

    Click here to enter

    May 18, 2020 • Eurolinguiste • Views: 196

  • Martial Arts Vocabulary in Japanese: Learn How to Talk about Karate in Japanese

    Earlier, I wrote a post that featured taekwondo vocabulary in Korean, sharing my interest and history in martial arts. Initially, I started with karate before moving to kickboxing and later kungfu, only to finally settle at a school that teaches both taekwondo and karate. The former a Korean practice and the latter, Japanese. 

    Because the school teaches a blend of Japanese and Korean arts, commands are given in both languages. We’re asked to move into ready stance in Korean, but told to bow to the flags and black belts in Japanese.

    As I shared in my taekwondo vocabulary post, kinesthetic learning, that is, tying learning to movement, is a powerful way to learn a new words in a language. Particularly because not following commands in class meant having to do push-ups, and I hate push-ups. So knowing what I’m being asked to do in Japanese and Korean is paramount to avoiding those extra push-ups.

    And if you’d like to learn more Japanese karate words, Drops recently released several hundred new words to help you learn how to talk about Japanese culture. The topics cover everything from food to traditions and even–you guessed it–karate!

    Karate Vocabulary in Japanese

    The Japanese word karate in Kanji, or Chinese characters, is 空手 (karate). It might also be called 空手道 (karate-do). This literally means “empty hand”. It’s name is a clue to it’s style! 

    But before we get into specific vocabulary, first, let’s learn the basics! Here are a few branches of Japanese martial arts in Japanese.

    Types of Japanese Martial Arts Vocabulary

    Keywords for Japanese Martial Arts

    And here are a few more key terms including, the Japanese words for those who practice martial arts, the locations, etc. In this list, you’ll learn the word for instructor is sensei in Japanese. It’s worth going further with this particular Japanese translation. The word sensei is used for instructors and teachers but it literally means “the one who comes before in life”. This meaning is beautiful–it implies that we learn from those who come before us. Your karate sensei has already walked the path you are learning now! 

    Basic Japanese Words You Should Know

    If you study martial arts in a school where Japanese is spoken, there’s a good chance you’ll hear some of these words:

    Karate Commands in Japanese

    • Attention: きおつけ (kiotsuke)
    • Begin: はじめ (hajime)
    • Ready: よい (yoi)
    • Stop: やめ (yame)
    • Bow: れい (rei)
    • Kneel: 正座 (せいざ, seiza)
    • Move to ready position: 構えて (かまえて, kamaete)
    • Turn (around): 回って (まわって, mawatte)
    • One more time: もう一度 (もういちど, mou ichi do)

    Karate Stances in Japanese

    • Stance: だち (dachi)
    • Natural stance: 兵こだち (へいこだち, heiko dachi)
    • Informal stance: 結びだち (むすびだち, musubi dachi
    • Straddle stance: きばだち (kiba dachi)
    • Back stance: こくつだち (kokutsu dachi)
    • Cat stance: 猫だち (ねこだち, neko dachi)
    • Feet together stance: 閉塞だち (へいそくだち, heisoku dachi)
    • Front stance: 前屈だち (ぜんくつだち, zenkutsu dachi)
    • Sumo stance: しこだち (shiko dachi)

    Body Parts Used in Karate in Japanese

    Basic Karate Technique Terms in Japanese

    • Basic Technique: きほん (kihon)
    • Block: 受けうけ (uke)
    • Chi: き (ki)
    • Cross-legged sitting position: あんざ (anza)
    • Focus: 決めきめ (kime)
    • Form: かた (kata) listen to how kata is pronounced in Japanese
    • Form starting point: えんぶせん (enbusen)
    • Form Technique Application: ぶんかい (bunkai)
    • Karate mats: 畳 (たたみ, tatami) hear how tatami is said in Japanese
    • Kick: げり(keri), please note that this pronunciation changes to (-geri) when following another word but is said with a “k” sound when alone
    • Kneeling Technique: せいざわざ (seiza waza)
    • Punch: つき (tsuki)
    • Snap: けあげ (keage)
    • Sparring: 組手くみて (kumite)
    • Strike: うち (uchi)
    • Sweep: ばらい (barai)
    • Technique: わざ (waza)
    • Throw: 投げなげ (nage)
    • Thrust: けこみ (kekomi)

    States of Mind in Japanese Martial Arts

    • Martial state of mind: ざんしん (zanshin)
    • Meditation: もくそ (mokuso)
    • No Mind: むしん (mushin)

    Directions for Karate in Japanese

    • Back: うしろ (ushiro)
    • Front: 前まえ (mae)
    • Side: よこ (yoko)
    • Right: 右みぎ (migi)
    • Left: 左ひだり (hidari)
    • Low: げだん (gedan)
    • Middle: ちゅだん (chudan)
    • High: じょだん (jodan)

    Block Techniques in Japanese

    Earlier you learned that 受け is “block” in Japanese. It’s literal meaning is “receive”. This is because when blocking a punch or kick, you aren’t trying to stop it with brute force. Instead, you’re receiving it. Thinking of the blocking technique in this way will help you better executre your blocks. 

    • Downward block: げだんばらい (gedan barai)
    • Outside block: そとうけ (soto uke)
    • Inside block: うちうけ (uchi uke)
    • X block: じゅじうけ (juji uke)
    • Rising block: あげうけ (age uke)
    • Knife hand block: しゅとうけ (shuto uke)
    • Verticle knife hand block: たてしゅとうけ (tate shuto uke)
    • Sweeping block: ながしうけ (nagashi uke)
    • Back Hand block: はいしゅうけ (haishu uke)
    • Elbow block: えんぴうけ (enpi uke)
    • Augmented block: もろてうけ (morote uke)
    • Wedge block: かけわけうけ (kakewake uke)

    Japanese Word for Sparring Techniques

    “Sparring” in Japanese is kumite. This word literally means “entangled hands”. Here are a few “entangled hands” techniques in Japanese.

    • Basic one-step sparring: 基本一本組手 (きほんいっぽんくみて, kihon ippon kumite)
    • Three-step sparring: 三本組手 (さんぼんくみて, sanbon kumite)
    • Five-step sparring: 五本組手 (ごほくみて, gohon kumite)
    • Semi-free style sparring: 地涌いっぽん組手 (じゆいっぽんくみて, jiyu ippon kumite)
    • Free-style sparring: 地涌組手 (じゆくみて, jiyu kumite)
    • Reaction sparring: 開始一本組手 (かいしいっぽんくみて, kaishi ippon kumite)

    More Kicks in Japanese

    • Roundhouse kick: まわしげり (mawashi geri)
    • Knee kick: ひざげり (hiza geri)
    • Side thrust kick:よこげりけこみ (yoko geri kekomi)
    • Side snap kick: よこげりけあげ (yoko geri keage)
    • Kicking combinations: れんげり (ren geri)

    Punches & Strikes in Japanese

    • Straight punch: からつき (kara tsuki)
    • Stepping punch: おいつき (oi tsuki)
    • Front hand punch: きざみつき (kizami tsuki)
    • Reverse punch: ぎゃくつき (gyaku tsuki)
    • Hook punch: かぎつき (kagi tsuki)
    • Two punch combo: れんつき (ren tsuki)
    • Hammer fist: てついうち (tetsui uchi)
    • Back fist: うらけんうち (uraken uchi)
    • Ridge hand: はいとうち (haito uchi)
    • Knife hand: しゅとうち (shuto uchi)
    • Spear hand: ぬきて (nukite)
    • Elbow strike: えんぴうち (enpi-uchi)
    • Reverse elbow strike: うしろえんぴうち (ushiro enpi uchi)
    • Return hands to ready position: ひきて (hikite)

    Now it’s your turn. Practice these words and expressions, and if you’re in karate or another branch of Japanese martial arts, see if you recognize any of them! You can also look up instructional videos for karate in Japanese to test your new vocabulary. This will help you instill these terms in Japanese. 

    If you’re ready to take what you’ve learned to the next level, you can combine these terms to talk about combos in karate. And you’ll get to chat about one of your hobbies – martial arts – in Japanese. 

    What about you? Are there any karate-related words or phrases you’ve picked up in Japanese? Let me know!

    And if you’d like to learn more words like this in Japanese, don’t forget to check out Drops. A fun, engaging way to learn new Japanese words in just 5 minutes a day.

    May 14, 2020 • Language Resources • Views: 206

  • Martial Arts Vocabulary in Korean

    A few years back, I was really into martial arts. I practiced a branch of kung-fu, but ended up having to take a break. When I was ready to start up again, my school had closed. I didn’t start looking for a new school right away and a short break slowly became a long break. 

    As you know, I enjoy food, so it soon became clear that I needed to start doing some sort of exercise again to balance things out. I decided to start practicing martial arts again. 

    I found a new school, but it wasn’t kung-fu. Instead, they taught a combination of Japanese and Korean martial arts – hapkido, taekwondo, karate… 

    I went in for my evaluation to see if I could stay at the same belt level I was at in kung-fu. As the class lined up, the Master called out “차렷!” and I was like a deer in headlights. Wait, what?

    As the evaluation proceeded, I quickly realized that this class wasn’t just a physical learning experience for me, but also a language learning experience. Depending on what we worked on in class, commands were given in either Japanese or Korean. 

    Kinesthetic learning – tying learning to movement – can be a powerful way to learn a new language and this was my first opportunity to try it out. But not following commands in class meant push-ups, and I hate push-ups. So I decided to do a bit of preparation on my own. 

    I found a list of taekwondo vocabulary in Korean and started working with my tutor to learn and use it my very next lesson. 

    If you’d like to learn Korean-specific words like these, Drops recently released several hundred Korean culture-specific words. You can become a cultural inside and learn lots of new Korean words for free with Drops.

    Taekwondo Vocabulary in Korean

    The Korean word Taekwondo in Hanja, or Chinese characters, is 跆拳道. This literally means “to stomp / fist / way, discipline”. It’s name is a clue to it’s style! 

    But before we get into specific vocabulary, first, let’s learn the basics! Here are a few branches of Korean martial arts in Korean.

    Types Korean Martial Arts Vocabulary

    • Martial Arts: 무술 (musul)
    • Taekwondo: 태권도 (taekwondo), a martial arts focused on self-defense
    • Taekkyon: 택견 (taekkyon), a martial arts that involves a focus on tripping or unbalancing your opponent
    • Hapkido: 합기도 (hapkido), mostly focused on grappling with some striking

    Keywords for Korean Martial Arts

    And here are a few more key terms including, the Korean words for those who practice martial arts, the locations, etc.

    • Master Instructor: 사범님 (sabeomnim)
    • Student: 학생 (haksaeng), also 제자 (jeja) depending on the system
    • Senior Student: 선배님 (seonbaenim)
    • Dojo: 도장 (dochang)
    • Uniform: 도복 (dobok)
    • Belt: 띠 (tti)
    • Belt grades (before black belt): 급 (keup)
    • Belt grades (after black belt): 단 (dan)
    • Kiyah!: 기합 (kihap), this is yell done by martial arts practicioners when striking or kicking to help with power)

    Taekwondo Commands in Korean

    • Attention: 차렷 (charyeot)
    • Begin: 시작 (shijak)
    • Continue: 계속 (kyesok)
    • Ready: 준비 (junbi)
    • Stop: 갈려 (kalryeo)
    • Return: 바로 (baro), used when you need to return to face an instructor at the end of a form
    • Bow: 경례 (kyeongrye)

    Body Parts Used in Taekwondo in Korean

    Basic Taekwondo Technique Nouns in Korean

    • Block: 막기 (makgi)
    • Breaking: 격파 (kyeokpa)
    • Dodge: 피하기 (pihagi)
    • Forms: 품새 (pumsae)
    • Grab: 잡기 (jabgi)
    • Jump: 뛰기 (ttwigi
    • Kick: 차기 (chagi)
    • Punch: 지르기 (chireugi)
    • Push: 밀기 (milgi)
    • Sparring: 구르기 (kureugi)
    • Stance: 서기 (seogi)
    • Horse Stance: 주춤서기 (suchum seogi)
    • Strike: 치기 (chigi)
    • Thrust: 찌르기 (jjireugi)

    Basic Taekwondo Technique Verbs in Korean

    • To block: 막다 (makda)
    • To dodge: 피하다 (pihada)
    • To grab: 잡다 (jabda)
    • To jump: 뛰다 (ttwida)
    • To kick: 차다 (chada), I kick is 저는 차요 (cheoneun chayo) listen to this phrase
    • To punch: 지르다 (jireuda)
    • To push: 밀다 (milda)
    • To spar: 구르다 (kureuda)
    • To stand: 서다 (seoda)
    • To strike: 치다 (chida)
    • To thrust: 찌르다 (jjireuda)

    Directions for Taekwondo in Korean

    • Back: 뒤 (dwi)
    • Front: 앞 (ap)
    • Side: 옆 (yeop)

    Combine Directions with Techniques in Korean

    By combining the direction with certain techniques, you can get more detailed vocabulary. Here are a few examples: 

    • Back kick: 뒤차기 (dwichagi)
    • Front kick: 앞차기 (apchagi)
    • Side kick: 옆차기 (yepchagi)

    More Kicks in Korean

    • Axe Kick: 내려차기 (naeryeo chagi)
    • Crescent Kick: 반달차기 (bandal chagi)
    • Hook Kick: 후려차기 (huryeo chagi)
    • Push Kick: 밀어차기 (mileo chagi)
    • Roundhouse Kick: 돌려차기 (dolryeo chagi)
    • Front Roundhouse Kick: 앞돌려차기 (ap dolryeo chagi)
    • Back Roundhouse Kick: 뒤돌려차기 (dwi dolryeo chagi)
    • Scissor Kick: 가위차기 (kawi chagi)
    • Spinning Hook Kick: 뒤후려차기 (dwi huryeo chagi)
    • Jump Kick: 뛰어차기 (ttwieo chagi)
    • Jump Front Kick: 뛰어앞차기 (ttwieo ap chagi)
    • Jump Back Kick: 뛰어뒤차기 (ttwieo dwi chagi)

    Punches & Strikes in Korean

    To get the terms for most strikes in Korean, you combine the body part or part of the hand with the word for “strike” as in the following:

    • Arc Hand Strike:  아금손 치기 (akeumson, literally “arc hand strike”
    • Elbow Strike: 팔꿈치 치기 (palkkumchi chigi)
    • Knife Hand Strike: 손 칼 치기 (son kal chigi)
    • Palm Strike: 손바닥 치기 (sonbadak chigi
    • Back Fist: 등 주먹 (deung jumeok)

    Now it’s your turn. Practice these words and expressions, and if you’re in taekwondo, see if you recognize any of them! You can also look up instructional videos for taekwondo in Korean to test your new vocabulary. This will help you instill these terms in Korean. 

    If you’re ready to take what you’ve learned to the next level, you can combine these terms to talk about combos in taekwondo. And you’ll get to chat about one of your hobbies – martial arts – in Korean. 

    What about you? Are there any taekwondo-related words or phrases you’ve picked up in Korean? Let me know!

    And if you’d like to learn more words like this in Korean, check out Drops. A fun, engaging way to learn new Korean words in just 5 minutes a day. Don’t forget, you can now learn several hundred Korean culture-specific words–pick up new vocabulary to chat about everything from K-pop to traditional Korean culture.

    May 14, 2020 • Language Resources • Views: 570

  • The Best Free Language Learning Apps in 2020

    Given the current situation, many of us have more time at home and on our own. You likely have a list of tasks you’d like to catch up on at home–cleaning, organizing, finally wheedling through that stack of books you’ve always wanted to get to… or maybe to finally start learning a new language. Or to just make the time to continue learning the language you already started.

    If that’s the case, you’re in the right place.

    Best Language Learning Apps

    Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to test out a variety of language learning apps and here are the best language learning apps I’ve come across during that time.

    Memrise — learn new vocabulary and basic grammar

    Memrise started out as a vocabulary learning app exclusively, but have since expanded. You can still use Memrise for free if you’d like to learn new words, but if you’d like to try out their courses, you’ll need to upgrade to a paid subscription.

    That said, they’re still one of the best language learning platforms out there if you like to make and study your own flashcards (I certainly do). Using this feature is free as are the community decks.

    Try Memrise.

    Drops — learn thousands of new words

    Full disclosure, I work for Drops. But I was a fan of this vocabulary learning app long before I became affiliated with the company. I originally featured them in a post on language learning activities you can do when pressed for time, and it’s the only language learning app I currently use on a daily basis.

    You get 5 minutes for free every ten hours. It’s an engaging, fun, and visually-memorable way to learn new words in a language and build a strong foundation.

    Try Drops.

    Duolingo — pick up the basics of a new language

    Duolingo is one of the most popular language learning apps out on the market today. It helps you learn new vocabulary and basic grammar, though its methods are somewhat unconventional and there’s even a Twitter channel dedicated to it.

    Try Duolingo.

    Google Translate — get translations on the fly

    Google Translate is an incredible tool, even if it’s translations still have room for improvement. I use it in a variety of ways–to get quick translations to or from a foreign language, to scan text so I can import it into LingQ (see below), to test my pronunciation using the microphone tool… The options are endless.

    Try Google Translate.

    Clozemaster — contextual language learning

    Clozemaster is an app that uses cloze, another way of saying “fill in the blank” to help you learn a new language through context. They offer a wide range of languages–including languages like Breton and Croatian!

    Try Clozemaster.

    The Best Paid Language Learning Apps You Can Try for Free

    The following language apps require paid subscriptions but offer free trials so you can test them out.

    LingQ — read and listen to your new language

    LingQ is a paid app, but you can try it out for free on a limited basis. The free trial isn’t really enough to get a good sense of how LingQ works if I’m being totally honest. But I can assure you that it’s worth upgrading your account if it works for your budget. It’s one of my favorite language learning apps out there.

    Try LingQ.

    Pimsleur — build listening comprehension and speaking skills

    Pimsleur started out as an audio course that was pretty cost-inhibitive (around $350 per level). Recently, however, they introduced a subscription model that makes using this audio course much more affordable. It’s $14.95/month (at the time of writing), but you can try it out for 7-days before making the commitment.

    Try Pimsleur.

    FluentU — use video to learn a new language

    Want to dive right into native source material in your language? FluentU uses videos on Youtube in a variety of languages to teach you new vocabulary and phrases in a language. You can try it out with a 14-day free trial. After that, it’s $20-30/month.

    Try FluentU.

    March 17, 2020 • Uncategorized • Views: 822

  • How to Work as a Freelance Translator

    My new album “Back Again” is out and I am so excited! There will also soon be a Croatian version of the vocal song on the album, too.

    On to #clearthelist …

    If you’re new around these parts, #clearthelist is a linkup where we share our monthly goals, and by we, I mean myself, and Lindsay of Lindsay Does Languages.

    We’d absolutely love for you to a part of our community. You can join us by adding a link to your own goal post below.

    So let’s get started, sharing our goals and motivating one another to #clearthelist!

    Please feel free to tag your posts or photos with either #clearthelist on your favorite social media channels!

    What’s Been Going On

    As I mentioned, I spent the beginning of the month back in Budapest, so prior to the trip, I spent some time refreshing my Hungarian. Beyond that, I continued to work on Hindi and German.

    And now you’re caught up!

    Last Clear the List Goals

    Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // We didn’t actually make it to any classes this week, but I did have the chance to work on Chinese on a few occasions.

    Read the next Language Reading Challenge book on my list. // In June, we’re reading a history of the region, culture, or language that we are studying. I read this.

    Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // There’s still so much to get through!

    Add1Challenge // I continued to learn as a part of Add1 and started my Korean Add1 as well.

    This Month’s Goals

    Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // A permanent item on my monthly list. 

    Read the next Language Reading Challenge book on my list. // In July, we’re reading something about a language we’re not learning.

    Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // So much more to learn!

    Add1Challenge // I’m still wrapping up my Hindi and German Add1’s soon and starting my Korean Add1.

    Resources I Used This Month

    A quick recap of the materials I am using.

    What I Am Using to Learn Chinese

    • LingQ – my favorite tool
    • iTalki Lessons – I have weekly Chinese lessons
    • Memrise – I do 18,000 points minimum per day 
    • Drops – they have a new character tool that is fantastic

    What I’m Using to Brush Up/Improve My French:

    What I am Using to Learn Russian:

    What I am Using to Learn Korean:

    What I am Using to Learn Spanish:

    What I am Using to Learn Italian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Japanese:

    What I’m Using to Learn Croatian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Hungarian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Hindi:

    What I’m Using to Learn German:

    What I’m Using for Little Linguist

    • Lots of books
    • Day-to-day interaction
    • Mommy and Me weekly classes

    Resources That Aren’t Language Specific

    The Biggest Lesson I Am Taking Away from This Month

    This month, I’m releasing my first solo album since 2012! I’ve worked on other albums and recordings under other names and as part of different groups, but this will be my first solo album since Behind Your Eyes. Working on this while keeping up my language studies was a challenge, but it taught me to really use those little waiting periods to the max.

    Don’t forget that I would love to hear all about your goals for this month! Please join us by adding your post to the linkup below! 

    Clear The List Linkup Rules:

    1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

    2. Link back to this post. You can use our button if you wish.

    3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

    4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

    5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList

    March 13, 2020 • Language Resources • Views: 557

  • BBQ Beef Baozi Recipe (Steamed Buns)

    Today I’m going to step outside of Europe for the first time as part of this series and take you to Asia! We’re going to do a BBQ beef baozi recipe (aka BBQ beet steamed buns).

    M and I often eat pre-packaged baozi purchased from the local market. I first became addicted to them while we were in Malaysia where they served them at our hotel. I had never even seen them before our trip there.

    Most of the baozi at our local market is made with pork filling and M doesn’t eat pork so we’re often limited in our choices. I didn’t realize just how easy baozi are to make on your own if you’re patient enough to wait for the dough to rise, but now that I do, we’ll definitely make these more often!

    BBQ Beef Steamed Buns Recipe | Eurolinguiste

    BBQ Beef Baozi Ingredients

    You’ll need a steaming basket and parchment paper to complete this recipe. This serves about 20 buns!

    For the dough:

    • 2.5 cups of flour (we used wheat flour but you can use all-purpose flour)
    • 2 tbsp sugar
    • 0.5 tsp salt
    • 1 pack of yeast
    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tbsp oil
    • 3/4 cup of water

    For the filling:

    • 1/2 lb of either ground beef or thinly sliced beef
    • green onion (to taste)
    • 1 cup of shredded cheese
    • 1/2 cup of bbq sauce (or more if you prefer)

    BBQ Beef Baozi Recipe, Steamed Buns

    Combine the flour, yeast, salt, baking powder and water in a large bowl. Knead the dough for about 5-10 minutes. Place the dough in a clean bowl (with some oil spread across the bottom so it doesn’t stick). Cover and set aside for one hour.

    While the dough is rising, prepare the filling. Slice green onion. If I am using thinly sliced beef, I first cut it into thin strips and then I sear it in the pan before mixing it with bbq sauce in a bowl. If I am using ground beef, I cook the meat completely before mixing in the BBQ sauce.

    Once dough has risen (after about an hour), flour your work surface and divide the dough in half. Roll out the first half and use either a cookie cutter or wide rimmed glass to cut out circles. Roll out the circles until they become thin.

    BBQ Beef Steamed Buns Recipe | Eurolinguiste

    Use a spoon to place the meat in the center of the dough. Add in cheese and green onion to your preference.

    There is a more traditional technique for folding the buns which you can find here, but I simply fold up the edges until they meet at the top and then twist the bun until it is sealed. Place a small strip of parchment paper beneath each bun.

    Bring water to boil in a small pot and place buns in your bamboo steamer. Steam on high (ten minutes for small buns and fifteen minutes for large buns).

    BBQ Beef Steamed Buns Recipe | Eurolinguiste

    BBQ Beef Baozi

    Notes

    For the dough:
    • 2.5 cups of flour (we used wheat flour but you can use all-purpose flour)
    • 2 tbsp sugar
    • 0.5 tsp salt
    • 1 pack of yeast
    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tbsp oil
    • 3/4 cup of water
    For the filling:
    • 1/2 lb of either ground beef or thinly sliced beef
    • green onion (to taste)
    • 1 cup of shredded cheese
    • 1/2 cup of bbq sauce (or more if you prefer)
    Combine the flour, yeast, salt, baking powder and water in a large bowl. Knead the dough for about 5-10 minutes. Place the dough in a clean bowl (with some oil spread across the bottom so it doesn’t stick). Cover and set aside for one hour.
    While the dough is rising, prepare the filling. Slice green onion. If I am using thinly sliced beef, I first cut it into thin strips and then I sear it in the pan before mixing it with bbq sauce in a bowl. If I am using ground beef, I cook the meat completely before mixing in the BBQ sauce.
    Once dough has risen (after about an hour), flour your work surface and divide the dough in half. Roll out the first half and use either a cookie cutter or wide rimmed glass to cut out circles. Roll out the circles until they become thin.
    Use a spoon to place the meat in the center of the dough. Add in cheese and green onion to your preference.
    There is a more traditional technique for folding the buns which you can find here, but I simply fold up the edges until they meet at the top and then twist the bun until it is sealed. Place a small strip of parchment paper beneath each bun.
    Bring water to boil in a small pot and place buns in your bamboo steamer. Steam on high (ten minutes for small buns and fifteen minutes for large buns).
    Honestly, you can really put whatever you want inside the dough – pizza fillings, macaroni and cheese, and sandwich fillings (like a reuben or pastrami).
    You can also make peanut butter and jelly baozi! Or nutella baozi!

    Baozi Steamed Buns Making Tips

    Honestly, you can really put whatever you want inside the dough – pizza fillings, macaroni and cheese, and sandwich fillings (like a reuben or pastrami).

    You can also make peanut butter and jelly baozi! Or nutella baozi!

    If you don’t eat them all, wait until they cool and then freeze them for later! You can reheat them by steaming them for a few minutes whenever the craving hits.

    BBQ Beef Steamed Buns Recipe | Eurolinguiste
    BBQ Beef Steamed Buns Recipe | Eurolinguiste

    This recipe is an adaptation of this more traditional Nikuman (steamed bun) recipe at Just One Cookbook.

    Have you made steamed buns? What’s your favorite filling to put in them? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below!

    gourmand-recipes-lg

    March 12, 2020 • Uncategorized • Views: 690

  • CLEAR THE LIST | MONTHLY LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES UPDATE | JANUARY

    In December, with the holidays, I enjoyed time with family at home. I continued to study Hungarian, but also returned to several of my previous languages. 

    On to #clearthelist …

    If you’re new around these parts, #clearthelist is a linkup where we share our monthly goals, and by we, I mean myself, and Lindsay of Lindsay Does Languages.

    We’d absolutely love for you to a part of our community. You can join us by adding a link to your own goal post below.

    So let’s get started, sharing our goals and motivating one another to #clearthelist!

    Please feel free to tag your posts or photos with either #clearthelist on your favorite social media channels!

    Last Month’s Highlights on Instagram

    A post shared by Shannon Kennedy (@eurolinguiste) on Aug 29, 2018 at 11:01am PDT

    Last Month’s Goals

    Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // We read together every night, so I’m always learning new words. 

    Read the next Language Reading Challenge book on my list. // In December, we read a book about a language that we’re not learning. I went through my Tuttle phrasebook for Arabic once more to relearn a few basic phrases.

    Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // Did this!

    Add1Challenge // I studied Hungarian each day as a part of the Add1Challenge. I also published my Day 60 video (though I had recorded it early in Budapest.

    This Month’s Goals

    Continue filling the gaps in my Mandarin vocabulary I’ve noticed since Little Linguist’s arrival. // A permanent item on my monthly list. 

    Read the next Language Reading Challenge book on my list. // I’m announcing next year’s reading challenge soon, so I’ll soon share what we’re reading in January.

    Keep working through my YouTube Queue.  // I still have several hundred videos to watch.

    Add1Challenge // It’s the last few weeks of my current Add1Challenge and the first two weeks of my next Add1Challenge.

    Resources I Used This Month

    A quick recap of the materials I am using.

    What I Am Using to Learn Chinese

    • LingQ – my favorite tool
    • iTalki Lessons – I have weekly Chinese lessons
    • Memrise – I do 18,000 points minimum per day 
    • Drops – they have a new character tool that is fantastic

    What I’m Using to Brush Up/Improve My French:

    • LingQ
    • Listening to French radio/podcasts

    What I am Using to Learn Russian:

    What I am Using to Learn Korean:

    What I am Using to Learn Spanish:

    What I am Using to Learn Italian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Japanese:

    What I’m Using to Learn Croatian:

    What I’m Using to Learn Hungarian:

    What I’m Using for Little Linguist

    • Lots of books
    • Day-to-day interaction
    • Mommy and Me weekly classes

    Resources That Aren’t Language Specific

    The Biggest Lesson I Am Taking Away from This Month

    I’ve mentioned it in a few of my interviews and live videos lately, but haven’t yet shared my big takeaway here. The last few months, my biggest takeaway has really been that my language learning habit isn’t the task, but the language itself. 

    Before I used the built-in streak tracking for many of the language learning apps I use and worked to maintain them. Because of this, my habit was using those apps. Lately, however, I’ve started exploring diversifyng my study methods and so now, my habit is spending time with each of my languages in some way as often as possible. The habit is time with the language, not a specific tool. 

    But because I like stats and keeping track, I still use something to monitor how frequently I’m studying. I discovered an app called Streaks that I use to track how often I study each of my languages. I really find it effective and enjoy it.

    Don’t forget that I would love to hear all about your goals for this month! Please join us by adding your post to the linkup below! 

    Clear The List Linkup Rules:

    1. Share your goal post whether it includes your aspirations for the month or year. Submissions unrelated to the theme or links to your homepage will be deleted.

    2. Link back to this post. You can use our button if you wish.

    3. Follow the hosts: Lindsay from Lindsay Does Languages and Shannon from Eurolinguiste.

    4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE: Please visit the site of the person who linked up immediately before you and leave them an encouraging comment! By hosting this linkup, we’re hoping to create a positive community where we can all share our goals. If you do not do this, you will be removed from the linkup.

    5. Share on social media using #ClearTheList

    Inlinkz Link Party

    December 27, 2019 • Eurolinguiste • Views: 596

  • Travel

    [show-map id=’1′]


    indonesia
    singapore
    france
    eurolinguiste-italy
    china
    spain
    united-states
    eurolinguiste-caribbean
    malaysia
    canada
    ireland

    December 7, 2019 • Uncategorized • Views: 2

  • Best Gifts for Language Learners

    It’s holiday season and I’m sure your inbox has been flooded with Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals. How do you decide which tools are right for you with so many amazing choices?

    Here are a few of my favorite choices and some of the items on my holiday wishlist:

    Best Gifts for Language Learners This Holiday Season

    The Language Learning League

    For a few years, Lindsay Williams of Lindsay Does Languages and I have hosted Language Study Club—a monthly membership for language learners looking for new community, support, and creative new language learning strategies. In the coming year, we’re being joined by Kerstin Cable of Fluent Language and renaming the membership course The Language League.

    You can sign up for Language League at a discount here.

    The Fluent in 3 Months Bundle

    Fluent in 3 Months is currently offering 85% off their Black Friday Collection. This includes The Fluent in 3 Months Challenge, a 90-day challenge that helps you build the confidence and skill you need to have a 15-minute conversation in your new language (ps. I’m the Head Coach!). It also includes a Travel Hacking Workshop with Benny Lewis, Conversation Countdown, and Easy Languages. And it’s just $97! The Fluent in 3 Months Challenge is normally priced at $247 so this is a killer deal.

    You can sign up for the Fluent in Months Bundle here.

    Olly Richards’ Uncovered Courses

    I recently took Olly’s German Uncovered course and was really impressed not only with the amount of content available within in the course, but the quality of the content. You’re guided from beginning to intermediate, learning tons of important vocabulary and grammar along the way. It’s currently available for French, German, Italian and Spanish and is discounted 67%.

    You can sign up for the courses here. 

    Drops

    Drops is my favorite way to learn new words for many of the languages that I study (they have more than 35 languages available). You can spend just five minutes a day with the app and learn several thousand words and phrases.

    You can sign up for Drops Premium here. (Or if you’d like to get a gift for your friend, here)

    Language Learning Accelerator

    My course Language Learning Accelerator, normally priced $147 is now available for $97. It’s an in-depth course on time management and energy management in language learning. If you’ve ever felt that you don’t have the time or energy to learn a language, this course will help you discover you do, in fact, have both!

    Get Language Learning Accelerator 

    Pimsleur

    One of my favorite audio courses is put together by Pimsleur. I’ve used it for every language I’ve learned, especially because it allows me to make good use of all the time I spend commuting. They’re currently offering 50% off their audio program.

    Up to 50% OFF CDs + 25% OFF Digital with Code: BESTDEAL

    Language Learning Notebooks

    A while back, I designed these fun language learning notebooks. They make great, affordable gifts for language learners!

    Get the notebooks.  

    What about you? What’s on your holiday wishlist? Let me know in the comments below!

    November 27, 2019 • Uncategorized • Views: 434

  • NEW LANGUAGE PROJECT: LEARNING HUNGARIAN

    Over the last couple months, I’ve been learning a language in secret. I recently revealed that language was Hungarian and now, I’m excited to share more details about this language project – the how, the what, and they why.

    But first, if you’re interested in following this project along, be sure to subscribe to the Drops blog! It’s where I’m sharing all my updates.

    Getting Started with the Hungarian Language

    Just over two months ago, I decided that I wanted to learn Hungarian.

    Why?

    Because I wanted to surprise my colleagues at Drops on our team trip. In November, we all met up in Budapest, Hungary and it seemed like the perfect occasion. Not only would I be in the country that speaks the language, but I’d also get to surprise the founders of Drops with their native language.

    I signed up for the Add1Challenge for motivation, keeping the details of my language a secret, saving my videos and updates for after the big reveal.

    In many ways, this project was different from anything I’ve done before. To start, it was a secret, so I was limited to how many people I could reach out to for help. Luckily, Benny Lewis over at Fluent in 3 Months completed a similar project – Hungarian in 3 Months. He and I chatted about language projects and learning Hungarian, and he offered me tips for filming the reveal in Budapest.

    Limitations Offer a Creative Environment

    One of the other things I really wanted to do with this project was change my approach. Lately, I’ve found a lot of success in the conversational approach and because of this, I’ve stuck to it for my last several projects. Getting too comfortable with a system or routine can cause learning plateaus and with a short-term project, that can be dangerous. 

    Rather than use all the resources, processes and methods I typically use when I start a new language (or refresh an old one), I did something different. 

    First, I limited myself to two resources – Drops and italki. I had originally planned to use three (a coursebook being the third), but ended up not using it. Doing this meant that I really needed to maximize my experience with the two resources I was using.

    I had to get creative.

    And that creativity not only led to several breakthroughs, but helped keep me from burning out during the time I spent studying.

    Second, I cut grammar out almost completely. During that time, I did not learn a single grammar rule. Instead, I studied tons of vocabulary and practiced the language with my tutor. In doing these two things, I learned some grammar through context without ever having to sit down and learn how to conjugate or use cases.

    Third, I took an almost month-long break in the middle of a two-month project. A few weeks before our trip to Budapest, I also had a trip to Shanghai, China for music. As a part of that trip, I needed to focus on preparing presentations in Mandarin and Japanese, so I had to step away from Hungarian until after I got back.

    Despite this break, I still successfully completed this project.

    Finally, I decided on every milestone I wanted to reach as a part of this project. There were eight in total. You can read about them more in-depth here, but here’s a quick summary:

    1. Learn 50 words in the first 3 days // This would get me access to the Drops Tough Words Dojo so that I could review challenging new material.
    2. Find a conversation partner // Having a date on the calendar would help keep me focused and on-track.
    3. Write my first script // This would help me navigate that first conversation. It included phrases and questions that I might need.
    4. Have a Hungarian lesson // I found a fantastic tutor on italki and ended up taking several lessons the week before the trip.
    5. Have an unscripted chat in Hungarian // Before I went to Hungary, I wanted to try to make my way through a conversation in Hungarian without the help of my script.
    6. Learn all the words in Drops // There were about 2,500 words in Drops while I worked on this project.
    7. Use Hungarian around Budapest // To get some practice in before the big surprise.
    8. Surprise the founders of Drops // The project conclusion!

    You can watch my project introduction video for more context:

    To Sum Up

    I plan on sharing updates for each of the milestones over on the Drops blog so you can follow along with my progress. Each post will include videos of where I’m at with the language as well as the exact steps I took to achieve each milestone.

    In the meantime, if you have any tips for me as a new Hungarian language learner or if you have any resource recommendations that you couldn’t have lived without, please let me know in the comments below.

    I look forward to hearing from you!

    Tips for Language Learning | Eurolinguiste

    November 27, 2019 • Language Resources • Views: 438